Bunker Hill, Nathaniel Philbrick, and Nantucket Ancestors

I have recently started following this blog, Boston 1775, (Thanks to Dan H. for sharing about this site!), and if you love Colonial history, especially the American Revolution, then I think you will like it too!

The owner/author of the page recently interviewed Nathaniel Philbrick regarding his new book, Bunker Hill, which I do plan on getting a copy of for my reference shelf. I am curious to see if I’ll find any New England ancestors in the book, too!

I read, and enjoyed very much, Nathaniel Philbrick’s Mayflower when it first came out in April 2007, and now after visiting his page at Amazon I see that he has many more books that I should be collecting! Wow!!!

I now realize that he is also a sailor, and man of the sea, and has written quite a few books on seaman and ships of Nantucket County, Massachusetts. My husband’s ancestors were big seaman and many died at sea off the coast of Massachusetts, Maine, and Nova Scotia.

My husband Brad, and our four children: Nathaniel, Rachel, Ethan and Abigail (all Colonial names) and our grandson Aidan, all share a rich ancestry in the earliest settlers of Nantucket Island and its history. Names such as: Abigail Starbuck the daughter of Edward Starbuck, the first “Starbuck” on Nantucket in 1659, and Captain Thomas Gardner who came to America in 1624.

So, I am going have to start building a collection of Nathaniel Philbrick’s books I guess? 🙂 What joy!

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4 Responses to Bunker Hill, Nathaniel Philbrick, and Nantucket Ancestors

  1. Thanks for the tip for both the website and the book.

  2. cellista says:

    Saw your blog on geneabloggers today and thought I’d come visit and say hi! We have a lot of the same interests, plus ancestors from Mass, Maine, and Nova Scotia as well! Thanks for this book recommendation. I love Philbrick’s books. If you have Nantucket roots, be sure to read In the Heart of the Sea about the whaleship Essex. Besides being a fascinating read, we found a relation in it–the cabin boy was a Nickerson as is my husband’s mother. Distant cousin, I’m sure. We have Bunkers in our line too and we love American history so I’m excited to read Bunker Hill.

    Kristiana
    http://goodwins.wordpress.com

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